Shirts and Accessories (22)

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  • Proudly proclaim your freedom from binary sexuality and your love of geek culture all at once, with this snappy 6″x3″ vinyl sticker suitable for the bumper of your car, your laptop, or your dorm room door.

    Wibbly-Wobbly Sexy-Wexy vinyl sticker by: $3.00

    Proudly proclaim your freedom from binary sexuality and your love of geek culture all at once, with this snappy 6″x3″ vinyl sticker suitable for the bumper of your car, your laptop, or your dorm room door.

    (And for those who don’t get the reference, allow the good Doctor to explain…)

  • Support the bi-annual Queers and Comics Conference with this diverse and beautiful limited edition collection of postcards with comic art from 36 LGBTQ cartoonists! Available at a special preorder price until May 1st. All proceeds go to support the Conference, which is coming up in May in New York City.

    Postcards from Queer Cartoonists: Benefitting Queers and Comics 2019 by: Alison Bechdel, Ajuan Mance, Breena Nuñez, Carlo Quispe, Dave Davenport, Diane DiMassa, Dylan “NDR” Edwards, Elizabeth Beier, Ellen Forney, Eric Kostiuk Williams, Gengoroh Tagame, Howard Cruse, Ivan Velez, Jr., Jeanne Thornton, Jennifer Camper, Jon Cairns, Justin Hall, Katie Fricas, Liuxing Johnston, Michael Fahy, Nicole J. Georges, Paige Braddock, Phil Jimenez, Rachael House, Rob Kirby, Rosa Colón Guerra, Rupert Kinnard, Sam Orchard, Sara Lautman, Sonya Saturday, Steve MacIsaac, Tim Paul, Victor Hodge, William O. Tyler, Bishakh Som, Beldan Sezen, $20.00

    Support the bi-annual Queers and Comics Conference with this diverse and beautiful limited edition collection of postcards with comic art from 36 LGBTQ cartoonists! Available at a special preorder price until May 1st. All proceeds go to support the Conference, which is coming up in May in New York City.

  • These spectacular, limited-edition 15″x16″ canvas tote bags feature “Queer Creatures” art donated by 40 LGBTQ cartoonists. All proceeds after production cost will help fund the Queers & Comics Conference, series, the most recent of which took place April 14-15, 2017 at California College of the Arts in San Francisco.

    Queer Creatures Tote by: Dave Davenport, David Kelly, Diego Gómez, Justin Hall, Rick Worley, Steve MacIsaac, Victor Hodge, Nicole J. Georges, Annie Murphy, Carlo Quispe, Dylan “NDR” Edwards, Ed Luce, Howard Cruse, Ivan Velez, Jr., Jennifer Camper, Rob Kirby, Tyler Cohen, Maurice Vellekoop, Alison Bechdel, Ellen Forney, Roberta Gregory, Tara Avery, Tony Breed, Sina Grace, Ajuan Mance, Elizabeth Beier, Gengoroh Tagame, Katie Fricas, Mary Wings, Megan Rose Gedris, Melanie Gillman, Patrick Fillion, Rachael House, Rachel Dukes, Rica Takashima, Robert Triptow, Rupert Kinnard, Sara Lautman, Sophia Foster-Dimino, Sophie Yanow, $20.00

    These spectacular, limited-edition 15″x16″ canvas tote bags feature “Queer Creatures” art donated by 40 LGBTQ cartoonists. All proceeds after production cost will help fund the Queers & Comics Conference, series, the most recent of which took place April 14-15, 2017 at California College of the Arts in San Francisco.

    These totes are in short supply and were brisk sellers at the event, so please order yours today!

    Thank you to all the contributing artists!

  • Show your support for LGBTQ comics with the Queers & Comics Conference T-shirt!
    100% cotton, available in adult small; medium, and large.
    Queers and Comics T-shirt by: $20.00
    Show your support for LGBTQ comics with the Queers & Comics Conference T-shirt!
    100% cotton, available in adult small; medium, and large.
  • Sale!
    Pride Postcards by: Bishakh Som, John Curtis Jennison, Jr., J. Tana Ford, Diego Gómez, Sina Grace, $5.00

    We created this set of six postcards as a way to celebrate Pride in 2020, while we’ve all been practicing social distancing, working from home, and taking extra care to keep ourselves and our loved ones safe. Pride Postcards are a way that each of us can send colorful images of Pride to people we care about, all over the country and stay in touch.

  • GRINDHOUSE! is a beautifully weird card game for two to four players set in the world of seventies B-movies. By collecting and playing the four colors of production cards with the requisite values for the genre you’re aiming for—and whatever review you’re aiming to get—you complete a production and rake in bucks at the box office. Earn more money than your competition and you win the game.

    GRINDHOUSE! The Card Game by: Charles “Zan” Christensen, Eric Logan, $40.00

    GRINDHOUSE! is a beautifully weird card game for two to four players set in the world of seventies B-movies. By collecting and playing the four colors of production cards with the requisite values for the genre you’re aiming for—and whatever review you’re aiming to get—you complete a production and rake in bucks at the box office. Earn more money than your competition and you win the game.

    What’s “grindhouse”?

    “Grindhouse” theaters were small movie theaters that made their mark in the seventies by showing low budget films for adults that more mainstream movie houses wouldn’t touch, and that were too extreme for TV. They were filled with horror, splatter, and exploitation movies that latched onto current trends, niche genres, and lurid content to sell tickets.

    Bucktown (1975)

    Blaxploitation movies were popular in big cities, with crowds hungry for black leads and stories that Hollywood couldn’t be bothered to give them. Despite the fact that the racier films might as well have listed their leads as “boobs”, there were opportunities for women to take the lead in ways they hadn’t before—in front of and behind the camera. Determined small-time directors could get a little funding for the freaky idea they had, as long as they could sell it to the late-night circuit.

    The Thing With Two Heads (1972)

    Sure, you got crap like the misogynist dumpster fire that is The Last House on the Left (1972), but you also got The Thing With Two Heads (1972), a prime example of the hot-button, sloppy strangeness of the time. A black death row inmate ends up with the head of an old, white bigot grafted onto his body and they argue about race relations as they flee redneck police on a dirt bike. Is that art, or is that art? (No, and no. But it sure is different.)

    The Abductors (1972)

    The “uneven” quality of these films—put another way, the “avalanche of garbage”—was the byproduct of a thriving independent film scene that was more accessible for filmmakers and allowed for some much weirder shit, for better or worse.

    It was an interesting moment where the studio system stumbled and the independent houses were on a more equal footing. At the grindhouse theater, you could catch a second-run screening of The Godfather (1972) paired with the forgotten low-budget gangster flick Bloody Mama (1970), starring a Tommy-gun toting Shelley Winters as “Ma Barker”.

    Bloody Mama (1970)

    Toward the end of the decade, the studios increasingly got in on horror and shocker movies and even poached the people behind them, like Wes Craven, Joe Dante, David Cronenberg, and Ivan Reitman. They increasingly turned to cineplex blockbuster event movies, like Star Wars and Jaws, that no indie studio could manage.

    The 24-hour grindhouse theater, formerly the primary venue for niche, low-budget movies, was abandoned for the comfort of your own living room, courtesy of a VCR and your local video store.

    And, just like that, the grindhouse era was over.

    The Game

    GRINDHOUSE! immerses players to this lost era of film with artwork from the original movie posters and advertisements. In the game, you’re a naive young Associate Producer, tasked by the sleazy company execs with shepherding movies from idea to release. Quantity is the goal. Quality is optional.

    The game focuses primarily on exploitation films from the first half of the seventies—Blaxploitation, Women in Prison, Car Chase Films, and even “Nunsploitation”, to name a few.

    Blue productions cards feature actors and actresses

    You’ll see some familiar faces in twilight of their acting careers—Shelley Winters, Jack Palance, Chuck Connors—as well as the breakout “stars” of the period like Pam Grier, Fred Williamson, and Bo Svenson. But you also get introduced to a lot of behind-the-camera folks you’ve likely never heard of: directors, producers, distributors, sound guys, stuntpeople, and music composers.

    Can you successfully gather a director, actors, and other necessary components of seventies genre films and release a whole slate of movies to theaters before your competitors?

    Can you shoehorn them into whatever genres haven’t already been played out?

    Can you impress (or nauseate) the critics sufficiently to get the attention you need to push your movie over the top at the box office?

    How to Play

    You can pick up GRINDHOUSE! in a just a few minutes, and no prior knowledge of the genre is necessary. (Trust us, though, these “classics” may rub off on you, and no amount of sanitizing wipes will get them off.)

    GRINDHOUSE! has three card types: Production, Genres, and Reviews

    The game uses colors and symbols to help you gather the talent and resources to put together your own low budget exploitation flick. There are three types of cards, each with a different back so you can quickly and easily separate them.

    GRINDHOUSE! comes with a rulebook, 70 Production Cards, 14 Genre Cards, and 12 Review Cards.

    The bulk of the game is played with Production Cards. These come in four different “roles”—Directors (yellow), Actors (blue), On Set (red), and Post (green). Each card has a play cost and most have one or more value symbols: afros, blood, boobs, buildings, explosions, fists, wheels, and reels.

    Production cards can have one or more value symbols in the upper left

    Each player can work on up to two productions at a time, which consist of Production Cards played in separate horizontal rows on the table in front of them. A production that contains all four roles can be wrapped (completed).

    A production can only be completed when it includes all four colors

    The Genre Cards and Review Cards are played on a set of Production Cards in order to wrap the movie. Both cards show a value cost—met or exceeded with the values on the Production Cards—and a box office haul for your completed film.

    You can play a Genre card if your production meets or exceeds its value cost

    But watch out! The market shifts as the game goes on. You can aim for a genre that you know will make money, like a Gangster movie—but be forced to pivot to Redneck Cannibal at the last minute if someone else beats you to it.

    The results can be delightfully strange. Team up Thalmus Rasulala, Lee Van Cleef, and Wes Craven to make a supernatural western set in Compton. Get the guy who did Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) to direct Fred Williamson and Nastassja Kinski in a Nunsploitation film.

    You went to film school for this? (Just kidding, you never went to film school.)

    Your wrapped production also needs a review that it meets the value cost for

    When a player wraps their final movie, the other players have a chance to wrap their remaining productions, and then the game ends. The player with the biggest box office haul wins the game, of course. (This isn’t the Oscars, it’s the Benajmins.)

     Game Design

    Every Production card showcases a real movie from the period as well as two other productions the person worked on. All of the people mentioned, all of them, actually existed, and some may still. GRINDHOUSE! is meant to be equal parts trashy and educational.

    Each game includes 96 cards (70 Production cards, 14 Genre cards, and 12 Review cards) in a double drawer box with a rules booklet.

    Mechanically, it is a San Juanization of the German game, Traumfabrik, that Eric’s good friend Josh Balvin gave him one year for Christmas. It’s set in a contemporary setting that Eric personally finds more interesting, and was willing to do all of the really sleazy research required for putting something like this together. (His eyeballs are still raw. His soul has been shaken.)

    But What About…?

    • Where are the space operas and giant animal flicks?
    • Where are the slashers?
    • And the ninja films, man. Where are all those goddamn ninjamovies?

    GRINDHOUSE! mainly focuses on the years 1972-76. (And maaaybe ‘78.) Those other genres actually hit about a decade later, and we’re saving them to make their debuts in a sequel. (Fingers crossed.) We’ll dive deep into those important sub-genres that we are all so captivated by, and introduce a new production icon, the tentacle!Spooopy.

    The Creators

    Eric Logan did the research and writing on GRINDHOUSE! and created its game mechanics. He is the impresario behind, and occasional barker for, the Raygun Lounge in Seattle.

    Zan Christensen did the graphic design on GRINDHOUSE! as well as additional research, writing, rules adjustments, and editing. He is a writer and the publisher for Northwest Press, which produces LGBTQ graphic novels and comics.

  • Send Mahmoud, the star of Al Qaeda’s Super Secret Weapon, to your friends and family to wish them a happy and joyous holiday season.

    Al Qaeda’s Super Secret Weapon X-Mas Card by: $2.00$12.00

    Send Mahmoud, the star of Al Qaeda’s Super Secret Weapon, to your friends and family to wish them a happy and joyous holiday season.

  • A delicious, all-over-print t-shirt, featuring Michael Wertz’ endpaper art from Theater of Terror, in your choice of either black or white.

    Theater of Terror T-Shirt by: Michael Wertz $29.99

    A delicious, all-over-print t-shirt, featuring Michael Wertz’ endpaper art from Theater of Terror, in your choice of either black or white.

  • Shower with Peaches! This shower curtain is adorned with the beautiful endpaper design from Theater of Terror, illustrated by Michael Wertz.

    Theater of Terror shower curtain by: Michael Wertz $29.99

    Shower with Peaches! This shower curtain is adorned with the beautiful endpaper design from Theater of Terror, illustrated by Michael Wertz.

  • Yeah, it’s crazy out there. It’s OK to panic… just follow it up with action.

    Freak Out then Get to Work shirt by:

    Available in assorted colors and styles.

    Yeah, it’s crazy out there. It’s OK to panic… just follow it up with action.