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    Howard Cruse

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From Headrack to Claude

by: Howard Cruse
Rated 5.00 out of 5 based on 1 customer rating
(6 customer reviews)

An ebook compilation of Howard Cruse’s gay-themed comic strips and comic book stories published between 1976 and 2008, with supplementary background material and a few unpublished extras. Some stories originally appeared in adults-only underground comix; for that reason this book carries a “for mature readers” warning.

$5.99

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Meet the Author
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Howard Cruse, the founding editor of Gay Comix, is the author of The Complete Wendel, From Headrack to Claude, The Other Sides of Howard Cruse, and the award-winning graphic novel Stuck Rubber Baby. Visitors to Howard Cruse Central (howardcruse.com) are welcome.
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Overview

An ebook compilation of Howard Cruse’s gay-themed comic strips and comic book stories published between 1976 and 2008, with supplementary background material and a few unpublished extras. Some stories originally appeared in adults-only underground comix; for that reason this book carries a “for mature readers” warning.

The included iPad EPUB edition of the book also links to Sean Wheeler’s half-hour documentary I Must Be Important, ’Cause I’m in a Documentary! which shines a spotlight on Howard Cruse’s life and career.

Details

Publisher: Northwest Press
Publish Date: 2012
Page Count: 114

Attributes

  1. Rated 5 out of 5

    From Headrack To Claude includes context-setting introductions by Cruse, and even though most of this material has been reprinted before (several times, in some cases), what’s most frustrating about the book is that it serves as a reminder of how little we’ve seen from Cruse since his masterful graphic novel Stuck Rubber Baby. A cartoonist, storyteller, and essayist this good shouldn’t be so idle… ” Read the review on The Onion’s A.V. Club.

  2. “The strips reprinted in From Headrack to Claude might not be new, but they’re as relevant as when they were first published. More importantly, they’re as well-written, as well-drawn, and as funny (and often more), as anything else that’s been published in the last 30 years, within or without the gay comics arena.” Read François Peneaud’s review on The Gay Comics List.

  3. “Cruse gives some background for each of the pieces, and his introduction tells his artistic coming-out story, starting with his forbears, and sampling his earliest approaches to gay subjects. Nice to read from the artist who nudged me out.” Read David Stern’s review on Doric Wilson’s blog.

  4. “The book makes a superb holiday present for both the mature gay who probably lived through much of the same adventures as Cruse’s cast of characters. But it also is an eye-opener for those new to the community. It helps bring the colorful history of the gay movement down to earth, in the form of characters and adventures that speak to all ages.” Read Larry Murray’s review on Gay in the Berkshires.

  5. “Cruse was the right talent at the right time and place to capture the burgeoning, uncloseted gay subculture as it tried to define itself, defend against homophobia, and worst of all, dealing with the nascent AIDS epidemic. Somehow Cruse distilled these heady forces to show the human condition of the everyday gay man, and so much the better when the hypocritical and self-centered folks get exposed along the way.” Read Joe Palmer’s review on GayLeague.com.

  6. “While the collection doesn’t include Wendel strips, which were already collected in a separate anthology, or his graphic novel Stuck Rubber Baby, available from DC Comics’ Vertigo imprint, it does give a comprehensive overview of his other strips with gay content and themes, along with autobiographical information. It draws a nice road map of his career, and illustrates his struggles at working “straight” jobs while wanting to be true to himself.” Read Anthony Glassman’s review on The Gay People’s Chronicle.